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Rabbi's Corner

Devarim: Just Do It!

The summer atmosphere lends itself to a freer and more spirited atmosphere; an environment that allows us to expand our horizons and forge forward towards those dreams and goals that we’ve been longing to materialize.

And yet even with all our good intentions and new steadfast resolutions, we haven’t managed to translate our efforts into actuality (at least most of us haven’t). Why not? Why are we inspired to move forward but then lose the excitement? And, more importantly, what can we do about it?

In the book known as “Ethics of our Fathers” our Sages teach us the following: "Do not say when I am free I will study, for perhaps you will not become free".  

This short teaching contains the secret to success: Good decisions need to be acted upon immediately.

There was a study conducted involving teachers who attend teacher training in-services and become excited by the great ideas that they learn. The research demonstrated that new ideas that are not tried within forty-eight hours, never get used. Intellectual theories or emotional feelings that do not have an immediate link to the world of behavior dissipate quickly. 

There is someone I know who loves New York Hebrew and all of its projects.  Every time I meet him he says: "You have such a great program with so much variety. One day we'll have coffee and study together. I just need to get my life in order and make some time for education" (P.S. He hasn’t cleared up his busy schedule yet....)   

So, as we experience this beautiful summer which inspires us to blossom and grow, let us remember the Jewish secret: DO IT NOW!

And, if this article inspired you, then how about doing a mitzvah this very moment. You can head on over to the charity box and put in a dollar, you can click on one of the Torah links on chabad.org and spend 5 minutes of Torah study, or you can pick up the phone and give your parents a 'just because' call. Whatever you do – how about doing it right now!

Wishing you a Shabbat Shalom,

Rabbi Mendy Shanowitz 

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